San Francisco Proclaims It is “Open to All” – Open to All

San Francisco Proclaims It is “Open to All”

Businesses and Elected Officials Across San Francisco Pledge to Take a Stand Against Discrimination

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Calla Rongerude, Campaign Manager, Open to All calla@opentoall.com | 415.205.2420

Clair Farley, Senior Advisor to the Mayor, Executive Director, Office of Transgender Initiatives clair.farley@sfgov.org | 415.671.3071

(San Francisco, March 12, 2019)—Today, the city of San Francisco issued an official proclamation declaring it is an Open to All city, pledging to welcome everyone regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, age, immigration status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, religion or disability. Mayor London Breed and Supervisor Rafael Mandelman announced via an official proclamation that the city was joining the national Open to All public education campaign. Open to Allunites and galvanizes national leaders in business, civic engagement, and the nonprofit sector to take a stand for the shared American values of fairness and equality—and supports the bedrock principle that when businesses open their doors to the public, they should be Open to All.

To commemorate the occasion, Mayor Breed and Supervisor Mandelman hosted a kick-off event in Harvey Milk Plaza in the Castro District of San Francisco featuring elected officials from across the city, community leaders, and business owners who have signed the Open to All business pledge.

“San Francisco has a long history of standing united to advance the national dialogue around acceptance, civil rights, and human rights,” said Mayor London N. Breed. “The Open to All campaign is about reinforcing our values and stating that no matter who you are, where you have come from, or who you love, you are welcome here in San Francisco.”

In addition to Yelp, which debuted an “Open to All” attribute in July 2018, Open to All includes national business leaders such as Gap Inc., Marriott International Inc., Levi Strauss & Co., and Lyft, as well as nearly 4,000 businesses large and small across the country. Open to All also includes nonprofit leaders such as the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, MALDEF, the Anti-Defamation League, NAACP-LDF, and the ACLU; and, more than 200 nonprofit members spanning civil rights and racial justice organizations; LGBT equality organizations; health and disability organizations; faith organizations; and more.

“By joining Open to All, the City of San Francisco is continuing its leadership in diversity and inclusion,” said Open to All Campaign Manager Calla Rongerude. “Civic and businesses leaders are committing to make residents and visitors alike feel safe and welcome regardless of who they are.”

The Open to All campaign, in partnership with the City of San Francisco Office of Economic and Workforce Development and the San Francisco Department of Transgender Initiatives, Mayor London Breed, and Supervisor Rafael Mandelman are calling on businesses across the city to sign the Open to All business pledge and join the effort. Businesses that take the pledge are featured publicly on the Open to All website.

“I am proud to say that Paper Tree has always been an ‘Open to All’ business,” said Linda Mihara, owner of Paper Tree, a small business in San Francisco. “Since we opened in 1968, we’ve celebrated the diversity of both Japantown and the Fillmore. For these 50 plus years, we have enjoyed introducing origami to San Francisco and the world—an art form that knows no racial or gender boundaries. We welcome all who visit this wonderful city to come to Japantown and visit Paper Tree, one of San Francisco’s Legacy Businesses!”

Mayor Breed and Supervisor Mandelman joined elected officials across the city to support Open to All. In addition, Supervisor Mandelman encouraged his fellow supervisors to vote to approve a resolution declaring San Francisco is Open to All at tonight’s Board of Supervisor’s meeting.

“San Francisco has a proud reputation as a city welcoming to all in search of acceptance, refuge, and opportunity,” said Supervisor Rafael Mandelman. “But even in cities like ours with strong nondiscrimination laws in place, people continue to face hostility in everyday situations. Nobody should have to fear being denied service at a restaurant or a safe ride home just because of who they are. By declaring our city Open to All, we are sending a strong message that discrimination will not be tolerated here.”

Businesses can join Open to All and sign the pledge at www.opentoall.com/business-pledge.

Click here or more information about the San Francisco kick-off event

 

Participating businesses include:

Take Action!

Spread the Word

Order window clings and a toolkit to reach out to local businesses. Ask them to sign the Open to All pledge and show their support publicly!

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Open to All on Yelp

Let supportive businesses know about Yelp’s new “Open to All” attribute and encourage them to check the box!

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Help spread the word about Open to All by sharing the images and videos linked below on social media using #OpenToAll

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Add your voice to the growing chorus of Americans who reject discrimination! Be a part of the Open to All campaign!

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The Facts

What is Open to All?

Open to All is the nationwide public engagement campaign to build awareness and understanding about the importance of strengthening our nation’s nondiscrimination laws—and to defend the bedrock principle that when businesses open their doors to the public, they should be Open to All.

The campaign was launched to focus attention on the Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission case before the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court’s decision in that case affirmed the importance of nondiscrimination laws, it did not end the discrimination that so many Americans still face every day. The laws in most states still don’t explicitly protect LGBT people from discrimination—and discrimination based race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, immigration status, religion, and disability still happens far too often.

How Can My Business Support Open to All?

There are several ways you can show your support. First, visit Business.OpenToAll.com to sign the Open to All business pledge. The pledge states that your business is committed to maintaining a welcoming and safe environment for all people (including customers, employees, visitors, vendors and clients) regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, immigration status, religion or disability—and that you do not discriminate or deny people goods or services based on any of these characteristics.*

When you sign the pledge, you’ll be mailed an Open to All window cling (available in versions with the Yelp logo and without). Display the signing in your window to let people in your community know that your business is Open to All.

Finally, you can designate your business as Open to All on your Yelp profile. Simply check the “Open to All” box in the factual attributes section and your profile will be updated. See “What’s the ‘Open to All’ Field on Yelp” on this page for more information.

*Nothing in this pledge prevents a business from following applicable employment laws with regards to work authorization.

TAKE THE PLEDGE  

I'm NOT a Business Owner. How can I support Open to All?

We need people across the country to engage with local business owners to invite them to be Open to All. Many business owners won’t know about the "Open to All" attribute on Yelp, the business pledge, or the window cling unless members of their own community share the news with them.

Open to All has developed a toolkit for advocates who want to spread the word about the campaign. To learn more and take action, click here.

How do I get the Open to All Window Signing?

If you’re a business, sign the Open to All business pledge. When you sign up, you’ll automatically be sent an Open to All window cling. Note that the clings come in two versions—one with the Yelp logo, and one without. Please choose the window cling you’d like to receive when you sign up.

If you’re a supporter and want to approach local businesses in your community and invite them to be Open to All, you can order an Open to All toolkit (including window clings). Click here to order a window cling and a toolkit.

What's the "Open to All" Attribute Field on YELP?

Yelp recently introduced a new “Open to All” factual attribute to its business page listings. This allows business owners to update the “More Business Info” section of their page (alongside such attributes as “Accepts Credit Cards,” “Takes Reservations” and “Gender Neutral Bathrooms”) to designate their business as “Open to All.”

If you’re a business owner who wants to use the new Yelp “Open to All” attribute, and for a visual tutorial on activating the new attribute, click here.

If you’re approaching local businesses in your community and inviting them to be Open to All, and you see they’re on Yelp, let them know about the new “Open to All” attribute and show them how they can activate it here.

What if an Open to All Business doesn't seem to be open to all?

We know that a business being Open to All can involve an ongoing dialogue. Why? Because even the best-intentioned businesses sometimes might not understand that certain interactions with customers, clients, vendors and employees could potentially create an environment that is not welcoming to all.

When businesses declare that they are Open to All, that’s an important first step in engaging in that dialogue. If you have an experience that suggests a business isn’t open to all, start a conversation. Help them understand what a particular interaction felt like, why it felt unwelcoming, and how you hope they can do better in the future. Most businesses that take the time to designate themselves as Open to All would welcome that kind of feedback and discussion—though it’s also important for both parties to assume best intentions and look for constructive solutions.

In some cases, however, the concerns might go deeper than that. If a business has mistreated a customer, client, vendor or employee in violation of state or federal nondiscrimination laws, it might be appropriate to approach one of the legal organizations who are part of the Open to All coalition to discuss the matter further. In addition, there are feedback channels—such as comment and review sections—where such concerns can be raised when other approaches are unsuccessful. However, in using those channels, it’s vitally important to avoid incendiary language, name-calling, and threats.

For additional ways that you can get involved and spread the word about the Open to All campaign, visit www.OpenToAll.com/Share.

What is Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission?

This case involved a Colorado bakery that discriminated against and refused to serve a gay couple in violation of Colorado’s nondiscrimination law. The bakery claimed it should be exempt from the state’s nondiscrimination law due to the religious beliefs of the bakery owner. In June 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in the case. While the justices found that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had not acted impartially when originally considering the case, they also affirmed the importance of nondiscrimination laws and made it clear that states can protect LGBT people from discrimination in the marketplace. Click here to learn more about the Masterpiece Cakehshop case.

Why wouldn’t people who are discriminated against just go somewhere else?

Imagine how you would feel if every time you walked into a restaurant, flower shop, hair salon, or bakery, you could be kicked out simply because the owner didn’t want to serve “people like you.” Do we really want to give businesses a right to tell customers, “We don’t serve your kind here”? The only way to protect countless Americans and their families from that kind of humiliation and abuse is to ensure that our nondiscrimination laws apply to all businesses that are open to the public, and that businesses commit to being open to all.

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Why should our laws require businesses that serve the public to be open to all?

As a nation, we decided a long time ago that when a business opens its doors to the public, it should serve everyone on the same terms. Most businesses want to do the right thing, but there are some that will only do what’s right when the law requires it. We are all entitled to our beliefs. But that shouldn’t give businesses a license to discriminate. Nobody should be turned away from a business simply because of who they are.

Learn More

What is Open to All?

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How Can My Business Support Open to All?

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I'm NOT a Business Owner. How can I support Open to All?

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How do I get the Open to All Window Signing?

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What's the "Open to All" Attribute Field on YELP?

Answer

What if an Open an All Business Doesn't Seem to be Open to All?

Answer

What is Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission?

Answer

Why wouldn’t people who are discriminated against just go somewhere else?

Answer

Why should our laws require businesses that serve the public to be open to all?

Answer

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