Open to All
Supreme Court Affirms Nondiscrimination Laws & Protecting LGBT People While Reversing Colo. Civil Rights Commission in Masterpiece. READ THE OPINION HERE.

Supreme Court Decision Affirms Nondiscrimination Laws

As a nation, we decided a long time ago that when a business opens its doors to the public, it should be open to everyone, on the same terms.

Today’s decision by the Supreme Court affirms that basic principle. While the justices found that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had not acted impartially when originally considering the case, they also made it clear that states can protect LGBT people from discrimination in the marketplace.

The Court’s decision affirms the importance of non-discrimination laws. But in more than half the country, our state laws do not explicitly protect LGBT Americans from discrimination in stores and restaurants, in the workplace, or in housing.

That’s why we have launched a nationwide campaign to call on businesses across America to declare that they oppose discrimination, and that they are Open to All.

Join the 160+ members of the Open to All coalition. Call on local businesses to sign the Open to All Business Pledge. And make your voice heard.


 
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Watch videos and download resources that examined the stakes in the Masterpiece case, provide tools for effective conversations about nondiscrimination laws, and more.

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Amicus Briefs

Amicus briefs (or friend-of-the-court briefs) are legal documents filed with the court that provide important information about a particular case.

In the Masterpiece Cakeshop case, 45 amicus briefs were filed to defend our nation’s nondiscrimination laws by a wide array of civil rights leaders, LGBT and allied organizations, leading businesses, and more, including:

Read the Briefs

The Facts

What is Open to All?

Open to All is the nationwide public engagement campaign to build awareness and understanding about the importance of strengthening our nation’s nondiscrimination laws—and to defend the bedrock principle that when businesses open their doors to the public, they should be Open to All.

The campaign was launched to focus attention on the Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission case before the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court’s decision in that case affirmed the importance of nondiscrimination laws, it did not end the discrimination that so many Americans still face every day. The laws in most states still don’t explicitly protect LGBT people from discrimination—and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, sex, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity and more still happens far too often.

What is the Open to All Business Pledge?

The Open to All coalition is engaging public-serving businesses to take the Open to All Pledge. By signing the pledge and displaying the Open to All sign in their store window (if the business has a storefront), business owners can commit to supporting nondiscrimination protections and send a powerful message that their business is open to all.

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What is Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission?

This case involved a Colorado bakery that discriminated against and refused to serve a gay couple in violation of Colorado’s nondiscrimination law. The bakery claimed it should be exempt from the state’s nondiscrimination law due to the religious beliefs of the baker owner. In June 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in the case. While the justices found that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had not acted impartially when originally considering the case, they also affirmed the importance of nondiscrimination laws and made it clear that states can protect LGBT people from discrimination in the marketplace.

Why wouldn’t people who are discriminated against just go somewhere else?

Imagine how you would feel if every time you walked into a restaurant, flower shop, hair salon, or bakery, you could be kicked out simply because the owner didn’t want to serve “people like you.” Do we really want to give businesses a right to tell customers, “We don’t serve your kind here”? The only way to protect countless Americans and their families from that kind of humiliation and abuse is to ensure that our nondiscrimination laws apply to all businesses that are open to the public, and that businesses commit to being open to all.

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Why should our laws require businesses that serve the public to be open to all?

As a nation, we decided a long time ago that when a business opens its doors to the public, it should serve everyone on the same terms. Most businesses want to do the right thing, but there are some that will only do what’s right when the law requires it. We are all entitled to our beliefs. But that shouldn’t give businesses a license to discriminate. Nobody should be turned away from a business simply because of who they are.

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What is Open to All?

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What is the Open to All Business Pledge?

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What is Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission?

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Why wouldn’t people who are discriminated against just go somewhere else?

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Why should our laws require businesses that serve the public to be open to all?

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